meltco

All of our ice melters are truly environmentally friendly in two ways. Each and every salt crystal is coated with MCi3 keeping our salt from damaging plant life and are manufactured without any Phosphorus, Nitrogen and Urea ingredients. It’s those ingredients, Phosphorus, Nitrogen and Urea, that cause algae blooms and ultimately devastation to aquatic life. After community members got together to clean up the Chesapeake Bay in 2013, a bill was passed by the state of Virginia prohibiting the use of any de-icing products that contain these ingredients. Vermont and Massachusetts similarly followed suit. Considering that we do not incorporate Phosphorus, Nitrogen and Urea ingredients in our manufacturing process, we are be able to continue doing what we do best, should laws within your state change, without delays. Being able to minimize the damage to our waterways makes a big difference to the entire ecosystem and we’re proud to be an industry leader in that regard.

“How much salt ends up in our water? A lot —84% of US streams measured in a recent research publication had increased chloride concentrations. That’s from the chloride half of Sodium Chloride (NaCl), the most common salt used on roads. Nearly 30% percent of sites monitored were over the toxic chloride levels of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) more than 100 days a year.” WIRED’s Gwen Pearson

Nitrogen and Phosphorus Pollution

“Excess nitrogen in the air can impair our ability to breathe, limit visibility and alter plant growth.”

Nitrogen & Phosphorus Free De-Icers

The Problem

“Nutrient pollution is one of America’s most widespread, costly and challenging environmental problems, and is caused by excess nitrogen and phosphorus in the air and water.

Nitrogen and phosphorus are nutrients that are natural parts of aquatic ecosystems. Nitrogen is also the most abundant element in the air we breathe. Nitrogen and phosphorus support the growth of algae and aquatic plants, which provide food and habitat for fish, shellfish and smaller organisms that live in water. But when too much nitrogen and phosphorus enter the environment – usually from a wide range of human activities – the air and water can become polluted. Nutrient pollution has impacted many streams, rivers, lakes, bays and coastal waters for the past several decades, resulting in serious environmental and human health issues, and impacting the economy.

Too much nitrogen and phosphorus in the water causes algae to grow faster than ecosystems can handle. Significant increases in algae harm water quality, food resources and habitats, and decrease the oxygen that fish and other aquatic life need to survive. Large growths of algae are called algal blooms and they can severely reduce or eliminate oxygen in the water, leading to illnesses in fish and the death of large numbers of fish. Some algal blooms are harmful to humans because they produce elevated toxins and bacterial growth that can make people sick if they come into contact with polluted water, consume tainted fish or shellfish, or drink contaminated water.

Nutrient pollution in ground water – which millions of people in the United States use as their drinking water source – can be harmful, even at low levels. Infants are vulnerable to a nitrogen-based compound called nitrates in drinking water. Excess nitrogen in the atmosphere can produce pollutants such as ammonia and ozone, which can impair our ability to breathe, limit visibility and alter plant growth. When excess nitrogen comes back to earth from the atmosphere, it can harm the health of forests, soils and waterways.”

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